[77] His childhood and early manhood were subject to parental authority.3. Merit in the sense of an action to which a reward is due on grounds of justice can only exist where there is some stipulation. The better sort get to their knees gladly, and cheerfully confess Him. That Scripture types might be fulfilled — Isaac, the offerings, the brazen serpent, etc.3. Pain was bad, shame worse, curse worst of all (Deuteronomy 21:23; Galatians 3:13; Acts 5:30).II. (3) Christ is willing to do anything for thee. The Ruler of all brought to the state of a creature.1. And yet it is a glory for humility that even proud men take a pride to shroud themselves in her mantle. The easiest death is painful, however downy the bed. ITS BEING MOST PAINFUL, which demonstrated —1. Pharaoh was humbled by His ten plagues. Thus are depicted, further, the noble submission and fortitude with which the brave man, brave because he is good, meets death. Even in Christ grace imparted worth to His natural actions (John 5:19). By successive processes He attained it. "The Scripture marks the special stages of His humiliation.1. JESUS BECAME OBEDIENT UNTO DEATH in that —1. (3) The exact and impartial justice of God and His most righteous remedy against sin. A cause there is. "Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree."1. Shall we therefore abandon hearing as well as kneeling? Jefferey, D. D.)The death of the cross wasR. But with the Captain of our salvation it was far otherwise. How will they jeopard dignity and even life but to leave a glorious name behind them. Three things made the actual death painful. Of His own accord. Not, however, that suffering in itself is acceptable to God; the thief suffered; it was the way in which the purpose for which it was borne which made it acceptable.3. divinity? Be faithful therefore.2. All is traceable to Divine mercy as its first source (Psalm 62:12), yet it is the Divine justice which is represented as under an obligation to repay the services which are rendered (Hebrews 6:10). How far obedient? 2. Not, however, that suffering in itself is acceptable to God; the thief suffered; it was the way in which the purpose for which it was borne which made it acceptable.3. To His people. God, though He have so exalted it, yet reckons it not exalted until we exalt it too. The captain was killed, and his vessel given over to the enemy. His works were not His own works but His Father's. He accordingly would be sued for mercy, nor would he grant it without compensation, and so did find us a Mediator and furnish us with means to satisfy Him.4. λόγος we must say somewhat; ὀμοῦ, do it together, not some speak and others keep mute; εξ, speak out, not whisper. The Servant of servants had not where to lay His head; no money to pay His taxes; no clothes but such as privileged hands had made for Him.3. But this grace is not the grace of adoption, but that of union. The name is not the sound but the sense — Him who is named. (b)By doing good as we have opportunity (Galatians 6:10). Three things are in it. Simon was compelled to humble his neck under the Cross. Jesus' Divinity: The; Council of Nicaea and Its Bitter Aftermath," Christian He was impeached of the highest crimes, and, although innocent, for them suffered death. He became obedient to teach us passive and active obedience to God's will. "Though He were a Son," etc. We know nothing now more honourable than Christian service. The name is not the sound but the sense — Him who is named. Death was the objective end of His mission. "His judgment was taken away."2. (2)The Son giving Himself. But this grace is not the grace of adoption, but that of union. His sacrifice was a free-wilt offering. He wears the body that will be His through eternity. God ever exalts for a cause. Hutchinson, D. D.)Obedient unto deathW. His choice of Nazareth as a home, the name of which fastened a stigma and a prejudice upon Him all His days.3. Raleigh, D. D.We have no difficulty in conceiving how a man of highest virtue, and noblest birth, and clearest intelligence, could assume an outward garb which would completely belie or hide his real character. The first we like well, but the latter not so (Luke 6:46).5. All look to the former, very few to the latter; but even so obeyed Christ. The entering into covenant and confirming by an oath were human types and shadows of the great covenant between God and man in Christ (Hebrews 7:21). He became obedient unto death. All look to the former, very few to the latter; but even so obeyed Christ. (b) The worst death. He trod not one step awry in sin, but many of the footsteps of sin appeared upon Him: e.g. THE CROSS AS ITS FOUNTAIN.1. WHAT HE ENDURED IN THAT FASHION.1. But death, in the person of Jesus, was the culminating catastrophe in the history of the "Man of sorrows." He became a bondservant that they might become sons and daughters (Galatians 4:1-5).VII. 10. Sin was the inlet of shame (Genesis 3:7). It was not simply glory for His body that He purchased, but exaltation and kingly power; a name above every name.2. the Greek noun homoiōma, "state of being similar in appearance, image, Accordingly this death did not fall on Him by surprise or chance. The circumstances of His arrest and trial.2. The justice of God is satisfied; the law is fulfilled; Satan is subdued; sin is abolished as it binds over to punishment, and is reflected in the conscience by way of accusation; death is slain. No! Even in Christ grace imparted worth to His natural actions (John 5:19). It was a most convenient touchstone to prove the genuine disposition and work of men, so as to discriminate those who can discern and love true goodness though so disfigured, and not be scandalized by the Cross.4. Who would say of any merely human being that he was "found in fashion as a man."2. (2) Had He died otherwise, He might have seemed to purchase our welfare at a somewhat easier rate. Wherefore seeing that a superabundant dignity of person was required God's arm brought salvation.5. Even in Christ grace imparted worth to His natural actions (John 5:19). He trod not one step awry in sin, but many of the footsteps of sin appeared upon Him: e.g. What is necessary therefore is for us to become the recipients of His grace? To us it is an introduction into the presence and companionship of God; to Him it was an abandonment into darkness unrelieved by a ray of Divine light, and whose solitude was unblessed by a whisper of Divine love. )Christ degradedJ. (6) By faith and hearty acceptance of Christ, let us put in for a share of, and get an interest in Christ's blood (Romans 3:25; Hebrews 9:14).3. And yet it is a glory for humility that even proud men take a pride to shroud themselves in her mantle. Even an heroic action loses its moral value if necessitated. Of His own accord. But why such a death, since any would have been sufficient; and why such a death odious alike to Jew and Gentile?1. A. Wherefore seeing that a superabundant dignity of person was required God's arm brought salvation.5. If Christ shed His blood for sin(1) let us shed the blood of sin (Romans 6:10, 11; Galatians 5:24). What in reason can be more powerful towards working penitential sorrow and religious fear, and stimulating true obedience?8. H. Hutchings, M. A.I. (3) Christ is willing to do anything for thee. self-seeking pursuit of political office by unfair means. (2)As a devout Jew, He fulfilled the whole ceremonial law. Let us gain a clear idea of a meritorious act. The penalty of breaking away from their Master was perpetual bondage under the curse (Galatians 3:10).2. Thus are depicted, further, the noble submission and fortitude with which the brave man, brave because he is good, meets death. (1) The power of Christ's example is general. (2) Nor could He have become the Head of the Church. Not to Lazarus' life again, but to life immortal; from shame to the glory of the Father which shall never fade, as all here shall.2. He prayed, and praying was heard, though He Himself was God. "Tenderness" (NIV), "compassion" (NRSV), "bowels" (b) The worst death. To us death is the chalice whose poison has been changed by the chemistry of redeeming love into nectar; to Jesus it was a cup full of the concentrated dregs of woe. The merit which appeals to goodness sets up no claim; that which rests on fidelity involves a promise; that which trusts to the justice of the rewarder implies a covenant.